Robert Skidelsky
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Nato’s deadly legacy from Kosovo
Robert Skidelsky
Financial Times | Tuesday, December 14, 1999

 
With the west's humanitarian concern now focused on Russia's assault on Grozny, it is a good moment to look back on Kosovo, not least because the renewal of the Chechen war is a direct consequence of the Kosovan operation. It showed Russia the "western, civilised" way of waging this type of war, and it tilted the balance of power in Russian politics towards the military.
 
The publication last week of "Human Rights in Kosovo", a report by the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, is another reason to revisit Kosovo, because it so clearly exposes the lies spun by Nato's war machine.
 
By now, it should be clear that Nato's military intervention in Yugoslavia was illegal under international law. The UN Charter limits

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Kosovo: The Balance Sheet
Robert Skidelsky
Financial Times | Tuesday, December 14, 1999

 
 
Ten months after the end of the Kosovan war sufficient time has elapsed and information accumulated to draw up a tentative historical balance sheet. I say 'historical', because what has been done cannot be undone. We must live with the consequences, and do our best in the new situation.
 
This does not mean, though, that efforts at historical truth are useless.Unless they are made, we fly into the future burdened with misconceptions and lies, which, at very least, make it more difficult to pursue sensible aims and policies. The vast superiority of the post-war settlement of 1945 to the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 is powerful testimony to the difference which learning accurately from the past can make. Too much is at stake not to make

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The First 100 Years: A policy that crippled:The Gold Standard debate
Robert Skidelsky
Financial Times | Sunday, February 15, 1998

 
A hundred years ago all the main countries of the world adhered to a fixed-exchange rate system known as the gold standard.
 
Their domestic currencies were freely convertible into specified amounts of gold; they maintained fixed proportions between the quantity of money in circulation and the gold reserves of their central banks. An ounce of gold was worth 3.83 pounds sterling and dollars 18.60, giving a sterling-dollar exchange rate of 4.86.
 
The appeal of the gold standard was that it provided not just exchange rate stability, which encouraged international trade, but promised long-run stability in prices, since the obligation to maintain convertibility acted as a check on the 'over-issue' of notes by governments.
 
The gold standard

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Book Review: Economics as part of the human condition
Robert Skidelsky
Financial Times | Thursday, January 12, 1995

 
Capitalism with a Human Face
By Samuel Brittan
 
Edward Elgar, £49.95
 
This collection of essays by the UK's leading financial journalist ranges widely, from studies in utilitarian ethics to technical macroeconomics. Samuel Brittan is as much at home with John Rawls as he is with Milton Friedman.
 
He brings to them the humanity, individualism and undogmatic outlook which have marked his weekly Economic Viewpoints in this newspaper since 1967, and the same passion to explain and argue. For Brittan, economics is a 'moral science' in the Cambridge tradition. It requires a specialised technique, but is always part of a wider discussion of the human condition.
 
'What has gone wrong with economics,' he writes in his introductory

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