Robert Skidelsky
Join our Mailing List
to be notified of any updates

Delivered by FeedBurner

Follow me on Twitter
Bookmark and Share
Newspapers

Articles from Moscow Times

What Are the Real Reasons for a War in Iraq?
Robert Skidelsky
Moscow Times | Thursday, February 13, 2003

 
Regime change in Iraq, probably by war, now seems inevitable "in weeks rather than months," as U.S. President George W. Bush puts it. France and Russia are unlikely to veto a United Nations resolution specifically authorizing the use of force against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. Their argument will be that, whether or not the war is justified, the most important thing now is to preserve the authority of the UN. But what authority will the UN have if it is simply a rubber stamp for U.S. unilateralism?
 
If war is inevitable, let us at least go into it with eyes open. The reasons we have been given for war are excuses: I doubt whether even the "hawks" in Washington and London believe them. The claim is that Hussein poses a formidable

Continue reading...
Bookmark and Share

The Unresolved Debate on Capital Flight
Robert Skidelsky and Pavel Erochkine
Moscow Times | Tuesday, February 04, 2003

 
 
Is capital flight a problem for Russia? Most people would say "yes" and would regard the recent reversal of capital flight as a positive sign for the Russian economy. But there is another school of thought that believes that capital movements should be a matter of complete indifference and certainly not the object of government concern.
 
In the decade following the fall of communism, money poured out of Russia. Although unreliable, estimates suggest that, in the 1990s, capital flight was $20 billion to $30 billion per year on average. The Economic Development and Trade Ministry, for example, thinks that $210 billion to $230 billion left Russia during the reforms, approximately half of which was "dirty" money, linked to money laundering

Continue reading...
Bookmark and Share

Do We Actually Need to Wage War on Iraq?
Robert Skidelsky
Moscow Times | Friday, October 11, 2002

 
The United States wants to remove Saddam Hussein from power; its main allies would be content with his disarmament. The United States, therefore, wants to keep the United Nations weapons inspectors out of Iraq; its allies want to get them back in.
 
To reconcile these aims - at least formally - is the point of the intense jockeying now going on at the UN. The United States wants a new Security Council resolution drawn up so as to make the early use of force legal. France and Russia, while not opposed to the use of force as a last resort, want to use existing Security Council resolutions to give disarmament a last chance. Britain finds itself between a rock and a hard place. It is co-sponsor with the United States of a resolution whose

Continue reading...
Bookmark and Share

A Blind Faith in Capitalism is Being Rocked
Robert Skidelsky
Moscow Times | Tuesday, August 06, 2002

 
Today, capitalism is under attack for the first time since the fall of communism. Three reasons are mainly, and coincidentally, responsible. First, bear markets rule in the three main stock exchanges of the world. Whenever a lot of people lose a lot of money, they blame business. Second, a wave of scandals has hit the United States, affecting some of its best-known companies - Enron, Tyco, WorldCom. Scandals and bear markets are connected: Dubious accounting practices that are submerged in a tide of prosperity are ruthlessly exposed when the tide recedes.
 
Finally, the anti-globalists have been gaining strength. Following Seattle in 1999, the anti-globalist movement has become increasingly articulate, well-organized and well-connected.

Continue reading...
Bookmark and Share

Try Trade for Peace, Instead of Land for Peace
Robert Skidelsky
Moscow Times | Friday, April 19, 2002

 
The United States has officially demanded an immediate Israeli withdrawal from the West Bank. Israel has vowed to continue its "war for survival." Meanwhile, the peacemakers shuttle sadly round the Middle East, oblivious to the fact that no one is listening to them.
 
All peace efforts are still based on the resumption of the "Oslo process," according to which Israel was supposed to turn over the occupied territories to a Palestinian state, the Palestinians were supposed to renounce their right of return to Israel and everyone was to live happily ever afterward.
 
However, there were two major flaws in this "land for peace" design. The first was that there was never enough land available to make the proposal acceptable - not nearly enough

Continue reading...
Bookmark and Share
Page 2 of 3 pages  <  1 2 3 >