Robert Skidelsky
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Social Market Foundation

The Future of the World Monetary System in Historical Perspective
Robert Skidelsky
Social Market Foundation | Tuesday, April 29, 2003

 
I.
 
Today most international monetary experts agree that global fixed-exchange rate regimes of the type of the gold standard or Bretton Woods cannot he made to work because of the inevitable politicisation of monetary policy. Any fixed exchange rate system would be subject to a fatal credibility problem. The politicisation of monetary policy, which brought down the gold standard in 1931, was accommodated in the Bretton Woods system by capital controls. But once capital controls broke down, Bretton Woods, too, was doomed. Since 1973 the rule, or rather non-rule, has been generalised floating. This is bound to continue, because of what Obstfeld and Taylor (1998) have called the 'open-economy trilemma'. A country cannot simultaneously

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Social Market Foundation
Robert Skidelsky
Friday, February 15, 2002

 
 
Ladies and Gentlemen, I’d just like to say a few introductory words at the launch of the Social Market Foundation’s newest autonomous body, the Centre for the Open Society, which as Phil Collins its director says, aims to insert, or perhaps reinsert, liberty into the heart of left of centre politics. .
 
It’s an eminently worthwhile endeavour which I hope will be widely reported as well as supported. In a perceptive critique of Third Way doctrines, Ralph Dahrendorf wrote ‘in all these speeches and pamphlets and books, one word hardly ever appears and never in a central place. That word is ‘liberty’. And he writes: ‘Today it seems more important than even a few years ago to begin a new political project with the insistence on liberty

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The Future of England’s Schools
Robert Skidelsky
Social Market Foundation | Wednesday, March 15, 2000

 
This conference is well timed. The debate on the future of education is opening up again, both intellectually and in party political terms, after a long period in the doldrums. The Prime Minister’s triple invocation of ‘education, education, education’ indicates a welcome sense of urgency, but in itself tells us nothing about policy .I want to concentrate on the structure of education, because ever since I got involved in the education debate thirteen years ago, I have always maintained that good achievement depends on good structure. It’s also right for an opening speech to put the structural discussion into historical context. The Prime Minister himself tried to do this in his recent Romanes Lecture at Oxford. My reading of the history

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